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  • GPU Training Essentials - Webinar

    25 - 29 June 2018

    GPU Training Essentials - Webinar https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/gpu-training-essentials-webinar If you are familiar with C/C++ or Fortran programming languages then you should definitely attend this course! You can learn: about GPU computing and why you might want to use it, learn how to make use of GPUs at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, learn how to use CUDA to write code for GPU-accelerated systems, learn how to use OpenACC to accelerate existing codes with GPUs, understand how the code you are using was accelerated with CUDA or OpenACC Registrations are now closed 2018-06-25 00:00:00 UTC 2018-06-29 09:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Pawsey Online Training : Overview of Containers in HPC

    27 July 2018

    Pawsey Online Training : Overview of Containers in HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pawsey-online-training-overview-of-containers-in-hpc Thursday 26th July 2018 at 9.30am AWST Webinar Session (90 min) Brief introduction to containers Overview of container options at Pawsey Example workflows and benchmarks using containers  Who should attend? Once the domain of enterprise and corporations, containers have emerged as a viable option for many workflows in the HPC space. Over the past year, Pawsey staff have been investigating and experimenting with different container solutions.  In this seminar we’ll discuss some preliminary findings, lessons learned, benchmarks, and a roadmap for how we envision containers being used at Pawsey.  We’ll also show some live demos of containers in action. This webinar should be of particular interest to the following research areas and users: Bioinformatics & Medical Researchers R users Python users Radio Astronomy Machine Learning OpenFOAM users Nimbus & Cloud Computing Note registration closes on Wednesday 25th July at 4pm AWST. Please register by completing the following form. 2018-07-27 01:30:00 UTC 2018-07-27 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Online Training: Overview of Containers in HPC

    21 February 2019

    Online Training: Overview of Containers in HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/online-training-overview-of-containers-in-hpc Thursday 21st February 2019,   9:30am – 11:00am AWST Please join us for our Webinar Session (90 minutes) : Brief introduction to containers Overview of container options at Pawsey Example workflows and benchmarks using containers (hands-on) Who should attend? Once the domain of enterprise and corporations, containers have emerged as a viable option for many workflows in the HPC space. Over the past year, Pawsey staff have been investigating and experimenting with different container solutions.  In this seminar we’ll discuss some preliminary findings, lessons learned, benchmarks, and a roadmap for how we envision containers being used at Pawsey.  We’ll also show some live demos of containers in action. This webinar should be of particular interest to the following research areas and users: Bioinformatics & Medical Researchers R users Python users Radio Astronomy Machine Learning OpenFOAM users Nimbus & Cloud Computing   For the full experience of how to create, use and manage containers we encourage registrants to install Docker and Docker Compose (https://www.docker.com) on their own workstations/laptops and setup an account on NVIDIA-GPU cloud (https://ngc.nvidia.com). Zeus cluster training accounts will be available for the duration of the course. Please note registrations close at 4pm AWST on Tuesday 19th February 2019. Please register by completing the following form: 2019-02-21 01:30:00 UTC 2019-02-21 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Online Training Webinar: Python for HPC

    12 April 2019

    Online Training Webinar: Python for HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/online-training-webinar-python-for-hpc ["\nRegistrations have now closed!\nDescription\nIt’s no surprise that Python is one of the most popular languages amongst scientists", " it’s an easy language to learn, has a rich software ecosystem, and can provide relatively good performance.  However, researchers often run into issues when using Python in an HPC setting.  This webinar will focus on how to help researchers effectively use Python in their HPC workflows at Pawsey. \nWe’ll discuss some of the good (and bad) things Python does, cover different Python modules that researchers should be using to get good performance, and also discuss different ways of writing parallel Python code. \nThe course will mostly be run via Jupyter notebooks, allowing participants to work hands-on for most of the webinar. \nTo simplify software dependency issues, Pawsey staff will be providing a Docker container with the required Python modules and Jupyter notebook server.  If you want to use this container, you’ll need to have Docker installed on your laptop (https://www.docker.com/get-started).  This container will also be used to run examples on Pawsey’s Zeus system. \nYou are welcome to use your own Python modules if you wish (e.g. in Anaconda), but you’ll need to install the required packages before-hand (a complete list will be made available shortly). \nAgenda\n\nOverview of Python and how it fits into an HPC workflow (e.g. memory management, data structures, compiled vs. interpreted code)\nHands-on examples (via Jupyter notebooks) in the following topics:\n\nComputational modules (NumPy, SciPy, Scikit)\nI/O modules (pytable, h5py)\nParallel processing tools (Multiprocessing, MPI4PY, Numba, Cython)\n\n\n\nPlease note registrations will close at 4pm AWST on Wednesday 10th April.\nPlease complete the registration details on the form below. \nRegistrations should be made with institutional/business email addresses.\n\n  \n"] 2019-04-12 01:30:00 UTC 2019-04-12 03:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Cosmic Machines

    21 August 2019

    Cosmic Machines https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/cosmic-machines Registrations have now closed for Cosmic Machines. The use of Machine Learning in Astronomy is rapidly increasing, and the opportunities its powerful techniques present are exciting. However, the scope and dynamism of Machine Learning can make the task of starting to use it seem daunting. To assist researchers the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Astronomy Data and Computing Services (ADACS) present Cosmic Machines – an online workshop where participants will be guided through a hands-on introduction to the use of Machine Learning in observational astronomy. The focus will be on gaining an appreciation for the utility of Machine Learning and how to quickly get started using it in your own research. ADACS is a collaboration between Swinburne University, Curtin University, and the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, funded by Astronomy Australia Ltd, via the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, that aims to provide focused astronomy training, support and expertise to assist astronomers to maximise the scientific return from data and computing infrastructure. During the Cosmic Machines workshop,  we will provide you with data, code and access to a GPU – everything you need to enable you to take your first steps into the realm of ML in astronomy!   Prerequisites for participants Skills: Exposure to programming, no specific language required Equipment: Laptop or PC with internet and browser Schedule Challenge: Can we write a program to classify galaxies in SDSS images to better than 90% accuracy? 11:00 am to 11:30 am Setting the scene – Introduction to Pawsey & cloud computing 11:30 am to 12:00 pm Introduction to Machine Learning – Artificial neural networks and Deep Learning 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm Object detection – Introduction to Convolutional Neural Networks 12:30 pm to 12:45 pm Break 12:45 pm to 1:00 pm A Swiss army knife for research – Introduction to jupyter notebooks 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm Finding data – Machine Learning open data sets 1:30 pm to 2:00 pm Using the sweat of someone else’s brow – Introduction to Transfer Learning 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm Other challenges? – Identifying fireballs in Desert Fireball Network images with CNNs 2:30 pm to 2:45 pm Break 2:45 pm to 3:00 pm Review and Q&A   Registration Registrations have now closed for Cosmic Machines.  For more information or any questions, email help@pawsey.org.au 2019-08-21 03:00:00 UTC 2019-08-21 07:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Data", "Training"]]
  • Lunch and Learn: Test driving Nimbus with Simon Yin

    12 May 2020

    Lunch and Learn: Test driving Nimbus with Simon Yin https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/lunch-and-learn-test-driving-nimbus-with-simon-yin ["University research groups have adopted AWS, Azure and Nectar Clouds", " in April 2020, the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre launched a refreshed Cloud platform.  \nPlease note: This event is from 12pm AEST / 10am AWST \nJoin cloud user Simon Yin, Research Software Engineer, from the Research Technology Services team at UNSW, for a lunch and learn. He will walk-through his test-drvie of Nimbus, setting up containers (Docker and Singularity) and running Shiny, a package that makes it easy to build interactive web apps straight from R.  \nYou can read Simon’s full test drive here. \nAll you have to do is register below", " when you do, meeting details will be emailed directly to you. \nPlease note: This event is from 12pm AEST / 10am AWST \n \n"] 2020-05-12 02:00:00 UTC 2020-05-12 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Training"]]
  • Quantum for industry growth

    28 August 2020

    Quantum for industry growth https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/quantum-for-industry-growth Come and join this upcoming Pawsey Friday to find out what Quantum computing has to offer to Australia’s industry from applications to the value it can deliver. Covering from Quantum’s Australia landscape to the roles and opportunities for SME’s. corporations, government, universities and investors, Quantum for Industry growth is an event not to be missed. Pawsey recently established a partnership with Quantum Brilliance – an Australian quantum computing company, using diamond to develop quantum computers that can operate at room temperature-  to advance Australian Quantum Computing. As part of that initiative, the Centre is seeking to develop quantum expertise among Pawsey staff and users, followed by access to a quantum emulator later on. If your sector can benefit from Quantum, you could be among the first few that will discover its power at Pawsey. If you missed our first Quantum event watch here. It will tell you more about Quantum computing and its possibilities. About the event The session is structured into: Three (3) presentations Dr Cathy Foley – CSIRO Chief Scientist Mr Shaun Wilson – Serial entrepreneur and co-founder of successful Quantum & AI companies QxBranch and Shoal Group Dr Andrew Horsley – Co-founder and CEO at Quantum Brilliance Panel discussion Joining the presenter will be: Mr Bill Bartee – Partner, Main Sequence Ventures Dr Maciej Cytowski – Head of Scientific Services at Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Virtual network session with each presenter What will be covered during the event The national quantum computing landscape Opportunities in quantum computing for industry The national quantum industry roadmap The pathway forward for generating a healthy quantum innovation community and industry Please register using the form below to save the date About the presenter Dr Cathy Foley- CSIRO Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Foley is Chief Scientist of CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency and innovation catalyst. CSIRO solves the greatest challenges through innovative science and technology. It is one of the world’s largest mission-driven multidisciplinary science and research organisations, collaborating with industry, government, academia and the community to unlock a better future for everyone. Dr Foley has made significant contributions to the understanding of superconducting materials and to the development of devices using superconductors to detect magnetic fields and locate valuable deposits of minerals. Dr Foley has a passion for advancing scientific research and has held various roles, including a member of the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council, President of the National Executive for Australian Institute of Physics, President of Science and Technology Australia, Editor-in-Chief of Superconductor Science and Technology journal, and Council Member for Questacon. In 2020, Cathy was recognised alongside Australia’s top scientific minds and elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. Dr Foley is a strong advocate for women in STEM and is committed to tackling gender equality. As a leader in CSIRO, she is working to enhance collaboration across the sector and turn more world-class research into benefits for the nation. Seeking to start the conversation between government, researchers and industry on the benefit of quantum technology to Australian Industry, Dr Foley, recently launched the quantum roadmap report. The report can be found here. Dr Foley LinkedIn Mr Shaun Wilson – Serial entrepreneur and co-founder of successful Quantum & AI companies QxBranch and Shoal Group Mr Shaun Wilson is an accomplished serial entrepreneur, most recently the Founder of quantum software company, QxBranch, and systems engineering company, Shoal Group. QxBranch, founded by Shaun, was recently acquired by Rigetti Computing in July-2019. QxBranch, is a spin-out directly from Shoal in 2014 (described here), QxBranch has garnered major brand-name clients world-wide across the finance, insurance, cyber-security, biotech, energy, sports and pharmaceutical. Shoal Group is one of Australia’s leading systems engineering company. Shaun also sits on a range of boards, for example, Space Industry Association of Australia. Mr Wilson LinkedIn Dr Andrew Horsley – Co-founder and CEO at Quantum Brilliance Dr Andrew Horsley is CEO and co-founder of Quantum Brilliance, a Canberra-based start-up using diamonds to build quantum computers which operate at room temperature. Dr Andrew Horsley is a leading expert in designing, building and operating quantum computers and system. Prior to founding Quantum Brilliance, Andrew has over 8 years of experience in managing quantum engineering projects in Australia, Switzerland and Germany. Dr Horsley LinkedIn   Mr Bill Bartee – Partner, Main Sequence Ventures Bill is the Managing Director of Main Sequence Ventures (CSIRO’s venture fund) and focuses on investing in quantum technologies, AI/ML, synthetic biology, and data information. Bill has been working with technology founders in Australia and the US for 20+ years and has led investments in many multi-billion dollar companies including Seek, Altium, Looksmart, onebox, and Culture Amp. Bill was also co-founder and Partner of Blackbird Ventures  (Blackbird Fund 1 and 2 and Follow-on-Fund 1) one of Australia’s leading venture funds. Blackbird’s first fund is a top decile performer globally and is composed of leading companies such as Canva, Zoox, Culture Amp, Safety Culture, Autopilot, Accelo, and others. Bill has a depth of experience as a successful builder, CEO, and investor in addition to a deep network of venture and customer contacts globally. Bill holds a Bachelor of Science, MBA, and Juris Doctorate degrees. Mr Bartee LinkedIn Dr Maciej Cytowski – Head of Scientific Services at Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Maciej joined Pawsey in 2017 as a Supercomputing Application Specialist and holds a PhD in Computational Science. He is a mathematician and computational scientist and has expertise is optimisation and development of application on massively parallel and accelerated HPC systems. Since 2004 he has been involved in many HPC projects including porting weather prediction codes to Cray X1e vector architecture, accelerating astrophysical computational kernels on IBM Cell processors, optimisation of open-source simulation codes on IBM Power7 architecture and developing scalable codes on IBM Blue Gene/Q, Cray XC40. Maciej is a highly documented author with more than 25 publications in various fields of computational science. Dr Cytowski LinkedIn 2020-08-28 06:00:00 UTC 2020-08-28 08:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Seminar"]
  • The opportunities for Extreme Scale computing

    29 October 2020

    The opportunities for Extreme Scale computing https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/the-opportunities-for-extreme-scale-computing Around the world, science is leading the response to some of humanity’s greatest challenges, from cancer research to climate change and the discovery and exploration of new galaxies. The power and possibilities of scientific discovery are enabled by world-class supercomputing infrastructure such as that provided by the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre. As Pawsey undergoes its biggest upgrade since inception, this virtual event will bring together leading researchers from different scientific domains including health, radio astronomy and engineering to discuss the new capacity for discovery and breakthroughs that modern supercomputers like Pawsey’s will enable.  The event will explore the research possibilities that we can expect to see in the future as scientists leverage significant leaps in technology and look forward to exascale computing to tackle some of Australia (and the world’s) greatest challenges. Join us to discover the potential that supercomputers can bring to diverse research fields such as health, AI, and astronomy in a panel discussion moderated by Mark Stickells, Pawsey Executive Director. Hear about the biggest scientific discoveries enabled by HPC, and the next era of science and supercomputing from Australia’s leading researchers. Pawsey is pleased to host: Melanie Johnston-Hollitt, Director, Curtin Institute for Computation & Director, Murchison Widefield Array. Astronomy Amanda Barnard, Australian National University, Senior Professor of Computational Science, ANU. Machine learning and HPC Alan Mark, Affil Professorial Research Fellow, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland. Health If you are an Australian researcher with a computational problem at scale or an HPC enthusiast, this event is for you! This free event will be held online and there will be an opportunity for questions at the end of the discussion. Register to receive a zoom link closer to the event:   The event will take place at 10:00 am AWST 12:00 pm AEST 1:00 pm AEDT 2020-10-29 02:00:00 UTC 2020-10-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • NCI TechTake

    27 April - 30 November 2021

    NCI TechTake https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nci-techtake NCI Presents: TechTake is an exciting opportunity for international computational and data science leaders to discuss and demonstrate how technology supports research. Taking place on the last Tuesday of each month, this event will run online in order to reach diverse audiences across the globe and from all fields. TechTake is designed to prompt engaging and in-depth conversations about both the current state and potential futures of technology to broaden and deepen understanding. 2021-04-27 09:00:00 UTC 2021-11-30 17:00:00 UTC National Computational Infrastructure Canberra, Australia Canberra Australia 2600 National Computational Infrastucture training.nci@anu.edu.au [] researchers 1000 webinar open_to_all HPCresearchsoftwareData
  • Astronomy and Australia’s next generation of supercomputers

    29 April 2021

    Astronomy and Australia’s next generation of supercomputers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/astronomy-and-australia-s-next-generation-of-supercomputers As part of the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre’s new bi-monthly “Supercomputing Series”, you will hear from the Astronomy community, as they discuss possibilities of the Centre’s new capabilities. One more time, we have gathered a stellar group of researchers that will be discussing their experiences as part of a panel. This event will also see the creation of a Community of Practice (CoP) where practitioners will have the opportunity to connect and discuss topics of interest, share best practices, and help answer each other’s questions on astronomy and HPC. This event has now passed, the recording is available on Pawsey’s YouTube channel – https://youtu.be/-Y0BJar6gTw. About the event 9:30 am AWST / 11:30 am AEST / 12:30 pm AEDT Panellist Dr Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin University) Dr Luigi Iapichino (Leibniz Supercomputing Center) Lead of the Quantum Computing team at LRZ Dr Elaine Sadler (CSIRO) ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) Hosted by Professor Alan Duffy, astrophysicist and Director of Space Technology and Industry Institute at Swinburne University of Technology Topics covered during this webinar: Astronomy and the researcher’s work Current limitations and the potential of supercomputers to overcome them The next generation of astronomy research Pawsey supercomputing specialist supporting the astronomy community will join the panel (see here for staff bios): Pascal Elahi Lachlan Campbell Panellist bios Dr Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin University) Natasha works at the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research. She helped to commission the low-frequency SKA precursor radio telescope, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in outback Western Australia. Natasha specialises in developing new pipelines and algorithms for radio astronomy data processing, and searching the data for new discoveries. She used the MWA to survey the entire southern sky for the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, which gave astronomers the first “radio colour” view of the low-frequency sky. In 2017 she was named the WA Tall Poppy Scientist of the Year, in 2018 one of the ABC’s Top 5 scientists, and in 2019 a Superstar of STEM. In 2020 Natasha commenced an ARC Future Fellowship to expand the low-frequency view of the universe to greater depth and resolution than ever before. Dr Luigi Iapichino (Leibniz Supercomputing Center) Lead of the Quantum Computing team at LRZ Luigi is co-founder of the Bavarian Quantum Computing eXchange (BQCX). Among his research interests are quantum computing simulations on high-end HPC systems and HPC/QC integration. He completed his PhD in physics at the Technical University of Munich in 2005, working at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. Before moving to LRZ in 2014, he worked at the Universities of Würzburg and Heidelberg, involved in research projects related to computational astrophysics. At LRZ he was team leader of the Application Lab for Astro and Plasma Physics (AstroLab) collaborating with researchers on numerical simulations, code modernisation and visualisation of massive datasets. Dr Elaine Sadler (CSIRO) ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) Elaine Sadler is the ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) and Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sydney. She is an expert in the areas of astrophysics and galaxy evolution and has helped to lead several major astronomical surveys of the southern sky. As ATNF Chief Scientist, Elaine’s responsibilities include providing strategic advice on the science direction of the ATNF and CSIRO’s Square Kilometre Array (SKA) activities. She continues to carry out research in astronomy, and is co-leader of the ‘First Large Absorption Survey in HI’ (FLASH) project, which is using CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope in Western Australia to find out how the amount of neutral hydrogen in galaxies (the raw material from which new generations of stars can form) changes over cosmic time.   2021-04-29 01:30:00 UTC 2021-04-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Supercomputing"]]
  • Getting started with Containers

    12 May 2021

    Getting started with Containers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/getting-started-with-containers-92a11b8a-bc40-45ce-9610-e5d22d586776 What are containers? Who uses them? When, and why? You’ll hear an expert’s overview of using containers on supercomputers and the Cloud, and learn from real life examples of simple, domain-agnostic use. Absolute beginners are welcome to come along and ask the questions you’ve been too embarrassed to ask! This webinar is a collaboration between Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Australian BioCommons to celebrate Data Science Week. Presenter: Dr Sarah Beecroft, HPC Research Fellow, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Date/time: 12 May 2021 – 12:00-13:00 AEST / 11:30 – 12:30 ACST / 10:00-11:00 AWST Register here 2021-05-12 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-12 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Community of Practice", "Webinar"]]
  • Getting Started with Containers

    12 May 2021

    Getting Started with Containers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/getting-started-with-containers What are containers? Who uses them? When, and why? You’ll hear an expert’s overview of using containers on supercomputers and the Cloud, and learn from real life examples of simple, domain-agnostic use. Absolute beginners are welcome to come along and ask the questions you’ve been too embarrassed to ask! This webinar is a collaboration between Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Australian BioCommons to celebrate Data Science Week. Presenter: Dr Sarah Beecroft, HPC Research Fellow, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre 2021-05-12 10:00:00 UTC 2021-05-12 11:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Pawsey Supercomputing CentreAustralian BioCommons ann.backhaus@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all containers, bioinformatics, reproducible, portable, scalable
  • Ask Me Anything: SLURM

    17 May 2021

    Ask Me Anything: SLURM https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-slurm Pawsey Supercomputing Centre invites you to join us for a Pawsey Hour (Ask. Me. Anything.), our way of reaching out to the research community. Pawsey Hour AMA is an opportunity to join in a discussion with Pawsey expert staff and an online community of peers. This session will focus on SLURM, Pawsey’s job scheduler. If you have any pressing questions please join the session, especially if you are: New researchers who want to know if Pawsey services are for them Current users who have specific questions about our infrastructure and expertise, or their research challenges (within the Pawsey context) Register here, via Zoom. This Zoom session will be held on Monday 10 May from 10.00-11.00 am AWST. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting from Zoom. If you have any issues with registering or do not receive the Zoom details upon registration, please email us at help@pawsey.org.au. 2021-05-17 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-17 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["AMA"]
  • Ask Me Anything: Containers & Bioinformatics

    31 May 2021

    Ask Me Anything: Containers & Bioinformatics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-containers-bioinformatics Pawsey Supercomputing Centre invites you to join us for a Pawsey Hour (Ask. Me. Anything.), our way of reaching out to the research community. The AMA is an opportunity to join in a discussion with Pawsey expert staff and an online community of peers. This session will focus on Containers and Bioinformatics. If you have any pressing questions please join the session, especially if you are: New researchers who want to know if Pawsey services are for them Current users who have specific questions about our infrastructure and expertise, or their research challenges (within the Pawsey context) Register here, via Zoom. This Zoom session will be held on Monday 31 May from 10.00-11.00 am AWST / 12.00-1.00pm AEST. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting from Zoom and an opportunity to save this event in your calendar. If you have any issues with registering or do not receive the Zoom details upon registration, please email us at help@pawsey.org.au. The event will take place at 10:00 am AWST / 12:00 pm AEST on Monday 31 May 2021. 2021-05-31 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-31 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["AMA"]
  • PaCER Seminar: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    15 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Computational Fluid Dynamics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-computational-fluid-dynamics Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing.   Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. The second event of the series is focusing on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and features Prof Richard Sandberg and Evatt Hawkes, from the University of Melbourne and  University of New South Wales, respectively and Dr Christopher Leonardi from the University of Queensland.  The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes.  The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix.  Join us on Tuesdays of June to find out what their projects are about and the impact that could potentially have in the different research fields in Australia and around the world.  Register to join the online seminar here. About the projects GT-to-X-Gas Turbine simulations towards Exascale (GTx)  Towards exascale simulations for efficient, low-emissions gas turbines  Richard Sandberg – University Melbourne and Evatt Hawkes – University of New South Wales Collaborators: The University of Melbourne/ University of New South Wales / General Electric (GE) ARC Future Fellows, Prof Richard Sandberg and Prof Evatt Hawkes are joining efforts to work ‘Towards exascale simulations for efficient, low-emission gas turbines’. Their project aims to develop the next generation of highly efficient gas turbines, and gas turbines capable of burning renewable hydrogen fuel, a detailed understanding of flow and combustion physics and accurate and reliable predictive tools are required.  Focusing on i) upscale our in-house codes for Pawsey’s next-generation of supercomputers and beyond and ii) demonstrate the combination of these capabilities in unprecedented high-fidelity simulations of several main components of gas turbines at engine-relevant conditions, UNSW and University of Melbourne researchers are teaming up with the major gas-turbine manufacturer GE to enable the development of systems with improved fuel economy, lower emissions, and capabilities to burn renewable hydrogen. The produced data will shed light on important phenomena and will be used to improve predictive tools used in industry.  MaPMoPS  Massively Parallel Models of Particle Suspensions  Christopher Leonardi – University of Queensland  Dr Christopher Leonardi’s PaCER project will develop computational models of complex particle suspensions at previously intractable scales for the investigation of novel reservoir stimulation techniques. This work will rearchitect the team’s open-source computational fluid dynamics code, TCLB, so that it can best leverage the next-generation supercomputer systems.  It is currently difficult or impossible to observe the impact of these approaches, positive or negative, in experimental investigations.  High-fidelity computations at physically meaningful length scales, such as those proposed in this project, represent a paradigm shift in the way that subsurface operations are designed and tested, and have the potential to significantly improve the management of subsurface resources.  The outcomes of this project align with the Australian Government’s vision for a “gas-fired recovery” from the COVID-19 recession. The development of sophisticated predictive models for technical subsurface challenges, championed by reports from the Chief Scientist and Engineer of NSW, the US Department of Energy, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, among others. About the presenters Prof Richard Sandberg is Chair of Computational Mechanics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Melbourne. His main interest is in high-fidelity simulation of turbulent flows and the associated noise generation in order to gain physical understanding of flow and noise mechanisms. He also uses the data to help assess and improve low-order models that can be employed in an industrial context, in particular by pursuing novel machine-learning approaches. He received his PhD in 2004 in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Arizona and prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he was a Professor of Fluid Dynamics and Aeroacoustics in the Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics research group at the University of Southampton and headed the UK Turbulence Consortium (www.turbulence.ac.uk), coordinating the work packages for compressible flows and flow visualisations and databases. He was awarded a veski innovation fellowship in July 2015 entitled: “Impacting Industry by enabling a step-change in simulation fidelity for flow and noise problems” and has been granted an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship for 2020-2023. Prof Evatt Hawkes is a Professor at the University of New South Wales, Sydney (UNSW). His group applies high fidelity computational fluid dynamics models to turbulent, reacting flows that underpin the performance of combustion and solar energy systems. His work at the nexus of big data and engineering applications is usually carried out with the aid of largescale supercomputing resources with a view to making fundamental and practical advances in problems of industrial relevance in transportation, power generation, and other energy systems. Prior to joining UNSW in 2007, Evatt graduated from the University of Cambridge with a PhD in 2001 and subsequently worked as a post-doc at the Combustion Research Facility of Sandia National Laboratories. He serves as Associate Editor of Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, as Advisory Editor of Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, and regularly serves as co-chair for the Turbulent Flames colloquium at the International Symposia on Combustion. Hawkes’ contributions and leadership in turbulent combustion modelling have been recognised most notably by the award of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship in 2011, and in 2018 by his election as one of the inaugural class of Fellows of the Combustion Institute.   Dr Christopher Leonardi is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at the University of Queensland and an Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellow (Mid-Career). Christopher holds a B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering with Class Honours from James Cook University, a PhD in Civil and Computational Engineering from Swansea University, UK, and a Research Affiliate appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. Leonardi’s research is currently targeted at the development of large-scale numerical models which can be used to provide insight into the complex characteristics of fluid-solid interaction in oil and gas reservoirs. Much of this work is undertaken in close collaboration with industry via the UQ Centre for Natural Gas. Particular fields of expertise include the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flows, the discrete element method (DEM) for discontinuous systems, and the finite element method (FEM) for solid mechanics problems. In addition to his academic pursuits, Christopher has over five years of consulting experience, applying both computational and analytical techniques to solve problems in the mining and mechanical engineering disciplines. In that time he applied innovative FEM-DEM technology to industry problems in the areas of bulk materials handling, geomechanics, and structural mechanics. Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-15 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-15 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • PaCER Seminar: Particle and molecular physics

    22 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Particle and molecular physics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-particle-and-molecular-physics Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing. Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. During its third week, the series is focusing on particle and molecular physics and is featuring Prof Pat Scott from the University of Queensland, Dr Waseem Kamleh from the University of Adelaide, and Curtin University, Professor Igor Bray. The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes. The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix. Join us each Tuesday in June to find out about their projects and their research impacts across Australia and the world. Register to join the online seminar here. About the projects EXA-GAMBIT   Searching for New Particles from the Attoscale to the Exascale with GAMBIT Pat Scott Collaborators from the University of Queensland/ Monash University and The University of Adelaide  The broad objective of this project is to perform the world’s largest and most complete tests of theories for new particles and fundamental symmetries, by using astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics to attempt to detect new particles associated with physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics.  The Standard Model of particle physics is both the most fundamental and the most precisely validated theory in all of science– yet it is still incomplete. New particles are needed to explain the identity of dark matter and dark energy, why neutrinos have mass, why the Higgs boson is as light as it is, and why we are surrounded by so much more matter than antimatter.  This project will make it possible to combine the results of all relevant experiments and bring them to bear on all the leading theories for new particles, by using exascale computing hardware to simulate billions of possible experimental signatures simultaneously.  MCCC   Calculation of collisions with molecular targets using the convergent close-coupling method  Igor Bray Curtin University Bray’s project, Calculation of collisions with molecular targets using the convergent close-coupling method, will produce high-quality and comprehensive data describing the collisions of electrons and positrons with molecules, which are much needed in a range of applications. The next big step forward in the field of molecular collisions is the adaptation and optimisation of the MCCC codes to exploit the capabilities of the next-generation supercomputers, with a particular emphasis on accelerating the calculations using GPUs. These developments will allow the first-ever large-scale collision calculations to be performed for molecules more complex than H2, and the resulting data sets will drastically improve plasma models in a wide range of scientific and industrial applications. The GPU (Graphics Processing Units) implementation of the MCCC codes and optimisation for the next-generation supercomputer at Pawsey will allow, for the first time, for computationally-intensive calculations to be performed for the heavier hydride molecules. The comprehensive sets of collision data this will produce will represent another major step forward in the field of plasma science and the development of ITER, on par with the original development of the MCCC codes for H2. EmPRiSM  Emergent Phenomena Revealed in Subatomic Matter  Waseem Kamleh  University of Adelaide  The central goal of this proposal is to reveal emergent phenomena in subatomic matter through the development of novel algorithms that harness extreme-scale computing. Lattice quantum chromodynamics (Lattice QCD) is the fundamental theory that enables us to compute the properties of interacting matter. Advances in computing created by this project will unlock unachievable calculations of quantum fluctuations in the space-time vacuum. This research will develop computational techniques that transform our understanding of the nuclear matter that constitutes the observable world, from the atomic scale of elemental hydrogen to the cosmic scale of neutron stars. Exploring vacuum contributions to the structure of the proton and other strongly interacting particles, the research will advance theoretical understanding and challenge experimental programs. About the presenters Pat Scott is a particle and astroparticle phenomenologist. Pat works with particle theory and experiment, cosmology, solar and stellar physics, high energy astrophysics, statistics, computational physics, supercomputing and other things – usually two or three at a time. Pat is part of the GAMBIT Community, a group of other like-minded researchers from all over the HEP-astro diaspora, trying to put together all the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle that is the search for physics Beyond the Standard Model (of particle physics). A big part of that is dark matter, but really, they’ll take any new particles they can get. Pat was the Head of GAMBIT from its founding in 2012 to the end of 2020. Before joining UQ in 2019, Pat was an STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the Fundamental Physics Section at Imperial College, a Banting Fellow in the HEP Theory group at McGill University, a PhD student in the Cosmology, Astroparticle Physics and String Theory Group at the Oskar Klein Centre in Stockholm, and an Honours student at the Mt Stromlo Observatory at ANU in Canberra. Igor Bray is a John Curtin Distinguished Professor, and Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Curtin University. His research interests are in the field of Quantum Collision Theory, where he has over 500 publications with around 13,500 citations. He has received several national awards for his research and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, American Physical Society, and Institutes of Physics in the UK and Australia. In addition to his research, he is interested in education issues broadly, and in particular High-Performance Computing. Waseem Kamleh is a world-leading expert in computational physics, with a focus on the application of advanced algorithms and technologies to non-perturbative simulations. His PhD was awarded in 2004 from the University of Adelaide. He moved to Ireland to take up a prestigious post-doctoral position at Trinity College Dublin, returning to the University of Adelaide in 2007 where he is currently a research fellow within the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter. Waseem has conducted extensive work in the field of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD), examining the origin of mass, electromagnetic interactions, resonance physics, and dynamical fermion algorithms. His expertise in high-performance computing and theoretical physics has been recognised with large awards of supercomputing resources, including Pawsey facilities such as Magnus and Athena. An early adopter of GPU programming, he also leads the transformation of the lattice QCD research programme at the University of Adelaide onto advanced technology platforms. Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-22 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-22 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • Machine Learning Regression Model for Predicting Honey Harvests

    24 June 2021

    Bentley, Australia

    Machine Learning Regression Model for Predicting Honey Harvests https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/machine-learning-regression-model-for-predicting-honey-harvests The Australian Space Data Analysis Facility (ASDAF) is hosting a FREE event, investigating whether machine learning methods can develop predictive harvest models of a key nectar source for honeybees using data from weather stations and remotely sensed datasets. The seminar will be presented by Dr Tristan Campbell. Tristan is an experienced geoscientist, with over 20 years of experience in the application of remote sensing and geophysical methods to engineering, environmental and agricultural sectors. His doctoral research resulted in a method for quantitative prediction of honey harvests in Western Australia, which is available to the bee industry through a geospatial portal for beekeepers to assess site weather conditions and expected harvests. Tristan is currently researching methods for improving weather data accuracy as model inputs and the effects of fire regimes on honey production and biodiversity. Places are limited so registration is required. Don’t miss out! Register to attend event in-person: https://bit.ly/3gD0URq (Light refreshments will be provided) Register to attend event online: https://bit.ly/3vw6GJ7 Light refreshments will be provided. 2021-06-24 16:00:00 UTC 2021-06-24 17:00:00 UTC Australian Space Data Analysis Facility Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Australia Curtin University, Kent Street Bentley Australia Australian Space Data Analysis Facility info@asdaf.space [] [] [] open_to_all []
  • PaCER Seminar: Radio astronomy

    29 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Radio astronomy https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-radio-astronomy Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing.   Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. The last event in the series focuses on Radio Astronomy and showcases Melanie Johnston-Hollitt from Curtin University and Martin Meyer and Marcin Sokolowski from the ICRAR UWA and Curtin node respectively. The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes.  The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix.  Join us each Tuesday in June to find out about their projects and their research impacts across Australia and the world.  Register to join the online seminar here.     About the projects PIGI Parallel Interferometric GPU Imaging Melanie Johnston-Hollitt – Curtin University Collaborators: Curtin University/ University of Toronto/ Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Johnston-Hollitt’s project, Parallel interferometric GPU imaging, aims to combine the distributed nature of recent interferometric reconstruction algorithms with fast instrumental modelling using GPUs to accurately reconstruct images from extremely large data sets for future instruments such as SKA_Low To provide the first end-to-end exascale astronomy calibration and imaging pipeline which has been optimized for HPC, the team will scale up calibration pipelines and deploy them in a multi-node GPU scenario combined with modern imaging algorithms scaled and deployed on HPC. HiVIS – HI Visibility Imaging for the SKA   Delivery of a next-generation data storage approach to unlock deep SKA and pathfinder observations  Martin Meyer – ICRAR UWA  Collaborators: ICRAR / CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science / SKA Organisation Headquarters (SKAO)/ Oak Ridge National Laboratory  Meyer’s project addresses one of the most significant outstanding Grand Challenge Problems for the SKA Observatory – how to optimally image multi-day deep datasets.  By developing a sparse data storage and processing pipeline based on UV-grids, this project aims to reduce the visibility storage requirements for these projects by an order of magnitude. The developed methods will simultaneously enable critically needed reprocessing to optimise the scientific outcomes from these datasets and opens up the possibility for higher resolution spatial and spectral imaging than would otherwise be possible As a testbed, Pawsey will be used to image 250h of ASKAP (Australia Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder) data from the DINGO pilot surveys, along with 500h of its first ultradeep field. These will yield some of the deepest images ever taken of atomic hydrogen content in the Universe, enabling ground-breaking novel studies of the role this fundamental fuel has played in the ongoing evolution of galaxies and its connection to their dark matter halos. In addition, the results will demonstrate a solution for the SKA data challenges in deep imaging. BLINK (Breakthrough Low-latency Imaging with Next-generation Kernels)  BLINK and you’ll miss it: blazingly-fast all-sky radio astronomy pipelines   Marcin Sokolowski – ICRAR Curtin University  This project aims to bring Pawsey’s latest-generation hardware to make real-time, image-based transient searches feasible, applied to the Murchison Widefield Array, the foremost precursor telescope for the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array.  Making real-time, image-based transient searches feasible will require a combination of the latest data processing technology offered by modern supercomputers, and novel data processing algorithms that have been optimised for both speed and sensitivity to transient signals.   If the computational challenges in this area are overcome, the untapped potential to form widefield images with millisecond time and kilohertz frequency resolutions coming from instruments such as the recently-upgraded Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the upcoming low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-Low) will transform these telescopes into extremely powerful instruments capable of detecting Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), other fast transients like “rotating radio transients” (RRATs),  i.e. sporadically emitting neutron stars and possibly other phenomena in real-time.   About the researchers Melanie Johnston-Hollitt is an internationally prominent radio astronomer working in the space between astrophysics, computer science, and big data. She is Director of the Curtin Institute for Computation (CIC), a knowledge accelerator based on the use of data science and high-performance computing aimed at producing better outcomes for research, government, and industry. In her 20-year career, Melanie has been involved in the design, construction, operation, and governance of several major international radio telescopes including the Low Frequency Array in the Netherlands, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) in Western Australia, and the billion-dollar Square Kilometre Array (SKA) which will be hosted in both Australia and South Africa. She was a founding member of the Board of Directors for the SKA Organisation where she worked on the international governance, scientific, and technical aspects of the telescope. In particular, she led the Science Analysis Pipeline design and contributed to the Science Data Processor pipeline which will be needed to extract knowledge from the vast amounts of data the SKA telescope will generate. She is the immediate past director of the 65 million-dollar MWA radio telescope and spent 9 years involved in the project, including 6 years on the international executive board (4 years as board chair) and 3 as director. As MWA Director she oversaw the third phase of the MWA project realised via the design and funding for the new ‘MWAX correlator’ – a GPU-based bespoke compute system. Her research interests span the intersection between radio astronomy, signal and image processing, and big data analytics and she leads both the multi-disciplinary team of data scientists in the CIC and the galactic and extragalactic science team in the Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy who are exploiting the MWA and other telescopes to uncover the mysteries of the Universe. Martin Meyer’s research focuses on surveys for neutral atomic hydrogen (HI)  and the role played by hydrogen gas in the formation and evolution of galaxies.  Matin leads the DINGO survey, a project that will take deep HI observations with the Australian SKA Pathfinder to understand how the HI content of the Universe has evolved over the past 4 billion years.  In the lead-up to this project, He is working on CHILES, a  deep HI survey being carried out with the VLA, as well as wide-field HI stacking experiments in the GAMA G09 field also being observed with this facility.  Martin is a member of the SKA HI galaxy science working group.   Marcin Sokolowski is a Research Fellow at Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy (CIRA), Australia. Marcin received Master Degree in Physics from the University of Warsaw, Poland in 1998and a Ph.D. degree in Physics from the National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ) in Warsaw, Poland in 2008. Between 1998 and 2003 he worked as a software programmer in a software company. From 2008 until 2012 he was an Assistant Professor in NCBJ where we worked on software for the automation of wide-field robotic telescopes and algorithms for the identification of optical transients of astrophysical origin. In the last few years, he has been looking for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) and other transients at low radio-frequencies using the wide-field images from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and all-sky images from prototype stations of the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-Low). He works in a large international team of engineers and scientists on verification, commissioning and developing novel calibration methods for prototype stations of the SKA-Low to be built in Western Australia in the coming years.   Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-29 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Getting Started with Using the (Nimbus Research) Cloud

    29 June 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Getting Started with Using the (Nimbus Research) Cloud https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-getting-started-with-using-the-nimbus-research-cloud In this 90-minute webinar we introduce cloud computing and detail the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre’s cloud computing resource called the “Nimbus Research Cloud”. You will have ample time for questions and if you’re interested, you can also access a test environment to experiment with what you can do with cloud computing. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-06-29 06:00:00 UTC 2021-06-29 07:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Community of Practice", "Training"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Lunch n Learn: Teaching Online

    1 July 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Lunch n Learn: Teaching Online https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-lunch-n-learn-teaching-online In this 60-minute interactive session, we’ll share tips, tricks and gotcha’s. Whether you’re new at teaching online or have a seasoned online ‘presence’, join us. Together we’ll create a list of good practices that you can refer to over and over again, and that you can continue to build upon. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-07-01 04:30:00 UTC 2021-07-01 05:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Training", "Webinar"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Is your science causing your laptop to burn? Identifying when to scale your research

    1 July 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Is your science causing your laptop to burn? Identifying when to scale your research https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-is-your-science-causing-your-laptop-to-burn-identifying-when-to-scale-your-research How do you know when your dataset becomes “too big”? How do you know when your laptop can no longer do what you need it to do for your research? When is it best to use cloud resources? When is it best to use supercomputing resources? When do I need both (or neither)? The answers to these questions are project-dependent, and each project is different… but there are guidelines and best practices to help you decide. During this interactive session, we will seek to answer these and associated questions. We’ll hear real stories from individuals who have had to navigate these same questions and who will be on hand to facilitate discussion, based on years of experience working with early, mid and late career researchers. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-07-01 05:30:00 UTC 2021-07-01 06:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Workshop"]]
  • NVIDIA cuQuantum Session

    2 July 2021

    NVIDIA cuQuantum Session https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-cuquantum-session ["Speakers: Tom Gibbs, Manager, Developer Relations, NVIDIA", " and Shinya Morino, Senior Solutions Architect, NVIDIA \nNVIDIA cuQuantum is an SDK of optimized libraries and tools for accelerating quantum computing workflows. Developers can use cuQuantum to speed up quantum circuit simulations based on state vector, density matrix, and tensor network methods by orders of magnitude. The cuQuantum SDK will become the foundational element across quantum circuit simulations. Early work suggests cuQuantum will be able to deliver orders of magnitude speedups for all the major gate-based simulation methods researchers use today. \nThe research community – including academia, laboratories, and private industry – are all using simulators to help design and verify algorithms to run on quantum computers.  \nThis session will introduce NVIDIA cuQuantum and showcase accelerated quantum circuit simulation results based on industry estimations, extrapolations, and benchmarks on real-world computers like ORNL’s Summit, and NVIDIA’s Selene, and reference collaborations with numerous industry partners.  \nThis technical session is targeted to both academia researchers interested in the field of quantum computing, but also private industry working on developing tools for quantum circuit simulations. \nPlease complete the form below to register:\n\n"] 2021-07-02 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-02 02:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Training", "Workshop"]]
  • Ask Me Anything: Porous media visualisation and LBPM

    5 July 2021

    Ask Me Anything: Porous media visualisation and LBPM https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-porous-media-visualisation-and-lbpm If you are working on Digital Rock Physics and interested in fluid flow behaviour in Porous Media, this AMA is for you.  Please join us to discuss Lattice Boltzmann Method for Porous Media (LBPM) and the opportunities for Pawsey researchers.  LBPM is one of the most complete derivatives of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) focusing on porous media providing computational as well as visualisation modules at a micro-scale. LBM is a well-known simulation tool in CFD, producing highly reliable results.   LBPM:  focuses on porous media at micro–scale  is accurate   is scalable  has features integrated with upscaling tools/techniques in high demand in the oil and gas industry  is capable of running simulation in CSG/CBM as extremely heterogeneous unconventional reservoirs rocks is free and open-source   Is LBPM of interest to the research community working at scale? Join the discussion at this AMA, and send your questions in advance via the registration form.    More information about LBPM: https://github.com/OPM/LBPM  Register here to join this AMA. Below is a sample visualisation derived from open-source data https://pawsey.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/movie.mp4 2021-07-05 02:00:00 UTC 2021-07-05 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["AMA", "Visualisation"]]
  • NVIDIA High Performance Visualisation

    9 July 2021

    NVIDIA High Performance Visualisation https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-high-performance-visualisation NVIDIA Omniverse is an open platform built for virtual collaboration and real-time physically accurate simulation. Complex creator, designer, and engineering visual workflows are transformed as users and teams connect major design tools, assets, and projects for collaborative iteration in a shared virtual space. The recently released Omniverse ParaView Connector gives scientists a familiar path for getting their data into Omniverse. Via the connector, scientists can continue to use ParaView’s powerful infrastructure for data ingestion and filtering before ultimately importing it to Omniverse to create rich, impactful visualizations. But, importing scientific data to Omniverse does not just enable cinematic visualization using the latest rendering technologies. It also connects that data to the broader ecosystem of content creation and rendering tools already connected to Omniverse. This session will demonstrate the basic workflow of the Omniverse ParaView Connector and how scientists can start using it for their own visualization projects. 2021-07-09 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-09 10:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Kensington, Australia Kensington Australia Pawsey Supercomputing CentreNVIDIA training@pawsey.org.au [] [] webinar open_to_all data visualisation
  • AiLab Workshop: Introduction to Chatbots

    9 July 2021

    AiLab Workshop: Introduction to Chatbots https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ailab-workshop-introduction-to-chatbots NOTE: We provide all AiLab workshops virtually/online, as well as in-person. Introduction to Chatbots workshop explores how chatbots can be applied within organisations. This workshop compliments our other professional AI education workshops. Chatbots and conversational interfaces offer businesses the opportunity to streamline processes and provide end-users with the promise of improved customer support. Lead by an industry expert, this fun and interactive exploratory workshop introduces the concept of Chatbots (and some of the underlying AI that can be used with them), before discussing real-world examples and other possible uses. Some well-known implementation strategies/frameworks are also presented, as well as lesser known key considerations required for successful implementation. Introduction to Chatbots: Workshop Structure - Introducing AiLab - AI and Chatbots - Business Use Cases and ideas - Scope, risks and pilot solution - Summary and next steps - Learn more with AiLab! 2021-07-09 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-09 17:00:00 UTC Auckland University of Technology - AiLab Auckland University of Technology +61 (0) 8 8464 0787 [] HDR candidates, researcherstrainers 5 workshop expression_of_interest chatbotsAIconversational interfaces
  • Advanced Slurm Training

    13 - 16 July 2021

    Advanced Slurm Training https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/advanced-slurm-training-c9c8f1b1-93b6-4c1d-bc20-498e03b82453 ["This training is targeted at users who have already used SLURM but whose needs go beyond simple batch files or small interactive jobs. \nThe training outline follows: \n\nSlurm Refresher\n\nHow Slurm actually works.\nHow Slurm schedules jobs.\nHow long to wait", " how to better schedule jobs.\nSlurm and priorities", " how is it done?\n\n\nKey features\nResource Management\nRunning a job", " job/step allocation\n\nExamples – GPUs\nExamples – Job Arrays\n\n\nAdvanced Features\n\nTopology Aware Scheduling\nJob Sanity Check\nJob profiling\nMultithreading (SMT)\nHeterogeneous j obs\n\n\nJob Dependencies\n\nChain Jobs\nStaging input before running, and storing outputs\nMaster/Slave programs\nSubmitting collections of programs (multi-prog)\n\n\nSystem Information Job monitoring\nCheckpointing & Restart\nUse of SLURM API (plans to support this in the future on Pawsey systems)\n\nThis is now a waiting list, please complete the following form to be added:\nNOTE: This course is capped at 16 attendees. If you cannot attend all 4 sessions, please do not register. \n\n"] 2021-07-13 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 04:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Supercomputing", "Training"]]
  • Advanced Slurm Training

    13 - 16 July 2021

    Advanced Slurm Training https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/advanced-slurm-training The training outline follows: 1. Slurm Refresher - How Slurm actually works. - How Slurm schedules jobs. - How long to wait; how to better schedule jobs. - Slurm and priorities; how is it done? 2. Key features 3. Resource Management 4. Running a job; job/step allocation - Examples – GPUs - Examples – Job Arrays 5. Advanced Features - Topology Aware Scheduling - Job Sanity Check - Job profiling - Multithreading (SMT) - Heterogeneous j obs 6. Job Dependencies - Chain Jobs - Staging input before running, and storing outputs - Master/Slave programs - Submitting collections of programs (multi-prog) 7. System Information Job monitoring 8. Checkpointing & Restart 9. Use of SLURM API (plans to support this in the future on Pawsey systems) 2021-07-13 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 12:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Pawsey Supercomputing Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] 16 workshop host_institution slurmschedulersupercomputer
  • Excel for Researchers at USYD Online

    15 - 16 July 2021

    Excel for Researchers at USYD Online https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/excel-for-researchers-at-usyd-online ## About this course Data rarely comes in the form you require. Often it is messy. Sometimes it is incomplete. And sometimes there’s too much of it. Frequently, it has errors. We’ll use one of the most widespread data wrangling tools, Microsoft Excel, to import, sort, filter, copy, protect, transform, summarise, merge, and visualise research data. While aimed at novice Excel users, most attendees will walk away with new tricks to work more efficiently with their research data. 2021-07-15 09:30:00 UTC 2021-07-16 12:30:00 UTC Intersect Australia University of Sydney Intersect Training: training@intersect.org.au [] [] 30 workshop host_institution Exceldata wranglingPivot tablesdata visualisation
  • NVIDIA OpenFoam Session - rescheduled

    16 July 2021

    NVIDIA OpenFoam Session - rescheduled https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-openfoam-session-rescheduled Speaker: Stan Posey, Developer Relations , CFD and ESS, NVIDIA HQ, USA OpenFOAM is the most widely used non-commercial CFD software with an end user base of 10,000 organizations and 125,000 practitioners. Its high-quality development at similar level as commercial ISV software drawn the attention of the community and ESI OpenCFD declared “GPU enabling” among top 3 HPC priorities. This session will provide an overview of a new development aiming to accelerate OpenFOAM using the NVIDIA AmgX linear solver library that provides GPU support to the PETSc4FOAM library introduced during 2020 by members of the OpenFOAM HPC Technical Committee. This technical session is targeted at OpenFOAM users interested in using GPU acceleration for their CFD simulations. After you register, you will receive a registration confirmation. The Link to participate will be sent to you closer to the day of the event. Please complete the form below to register: 2021-07-16 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 02:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Slurm for beginners

    21 July 2021

    Clayton, Australia

    Slurm for beginners https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/slurm-for-beginners A test event for searching 2021-07-21 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-21 17:00:00 UTC None Monash College, 49 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, Australia Monash College, 49 Rainforest Walk Clayton Australia 3800 Monash University None [] [] dropin open_to_all []
  • GPU Training Essentials - Webinar

    25 - 29 June 2018

    GPU Training Essentials - Webinar https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/gpu-training-essentials-webinar If you are familiar with C/C++ or Fortran programming languages then you should definitely attend this course! You can learn: about GPU computing and why you might want to use it, learn how to make use of GPUs at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, learn how to use CUDA to write code for GPU-accelerated systems, learn how to use OpenACC to accelerate existing codes with GPUs, understand how the code you are using was accelerated with CUDA or OpenACC Registrations are now closed 2018-06-25 00:00:00 UTC 2018-06-29 09:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Pawsey Online Training : Overview of Containers in HPC

    27 July 2018

    Pawsey Online Training : Overview of Containers in HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pawsey-online-training-overview-of-containers-in-hpc Thursday 26th July 2018 at 9.30am AWST Webinar Session (90 min) Brief introduction to containers Overview of container options at Pawsey Example workflows and benchmarks using containers  Who should attend? Once the domain of enterprise and corporations, containers have emerged as a viable option for many workflows in the HPC space. Over the past year, Pawsey staff have been investigating and experimenting with different container solutions.  In this seminar we’ll discuss some preliminary findings, lessons learned, benchmarks, and a roadmap for how we envision containers being used at Pawsey.  We’ll also show some live demos of containers in action. This webinar should be of particular interest to the following research areas and users: Bioinformatics & Medical Researchers R users Python users Radio Astronomy Machine Learning OpenFOAM users Nimbus & Cloud Computing Note registration closes on Wednesday 25th July at 4pm AWST. Please register by completing the following form. 2018-07-27 01:30:00 UTC 2018-07-27 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Online Training: Overview of Containers in HPC

    21 February 2019

    Online Training: Overview of Containers in HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/online-training-overview-of-containers-in-hpc Thursday 21st February 2019,   9:30am – 11:00am AWST Please join us for our Webinar Session (90 minutes) : Brief introduction to containers Overview of container options at Pawsey Example workflows and benchmarks using containers (hands-on) Who should attend? Once the domain of enterprise and corporations, containers have emerged as a viable option for many workflows in the HPC space. Over the past year, Pawsey staff have been investigating and experimenting with different container solutions.  In this seminar we’ll discuss some preliminary findings, lessons learned, benchmarks, and a roadmap for how we envision containers being used at Pawsey.  We’ll also show some live demos of containers in action. This webinar should be of particular interest to the following research areas and users: Bioinformatics & Medical Researchers R users Python users Radio Astronomy Machine Learning OpenFOAM users Nimbus & Cloud Computing   For the full experience of how to create, use and manage containers we encourage registrants to install Docker and Docker Compose (https://www.docker.com) on their own workstations/laptops and setup an account on NVIDIA-GPU cloud (https://ngc.nvidia.com). Zeus cluster training accounts will be available for the duration of the course. Please note registrations close at 4pm AWST on Tuesday 19th February 2019. Please register by completing the following form: 2019-02-21 01:30:00 UTC 2019-02-21 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Online Training Webinar: Python for HPC

    12 April 2019

    Online Training Webinar: Python for HPC https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/online-training-webinar-python-for-hpc ["\nRegistrations have now closed!\nDescription\nIt’s no surprise that Python is one of the most popular languages amongst scientists", " it’s an easy language to learn, has a rich software ecosystem, and can provide relatively good performance.  However, researchers often run into issues when using Python in an HPC setting.  This webinar will focus on how to help researchers effectively use Python in their HPC workflows at Pawsey. \nWe’ll discuss some of the good (and bad) things Python does, cover different Python modules that researchers should be using to get good performance, and also discuss different ways of writing parallel Python code. \nThe course will mostly be run via Jupyter notebooks, allowing participants to work hands-on for most of the webinar. \nTo simplify software dependency issues, Pawsey staff will be providing a Docker container with the required Python modules and Jupyter notebook server.  If you want to use this container, you’ll need to have Docker installed on your laptop (https://www.docker.com/get-started).  This container will also be used to run examples on Pawsey’s Zeus system. \nYou are welcome to use your own Python modules if you wish (e.g. in Anaconda), but you’ll need to install the required packages before-hand (a complete list will be made available shortly). \nAgenda\n\nOverview of Python and how it fits into an HPC workflow (e.g. memory management, data structures, compiled vs. interpreted code)\nHands-on examples (via Jupyter notebooks) in the following topics:\n\nComputational modules (NumPy, SciPy, Scikit)\nI/O modules (pytable, h5py)\nParallel processing tools (Multiprocessing, MPI4PY, Numba, Cython)\n\n\n\nPlease note registrations will close at 4pm AWST on Wednesday 10th April.\nPlease complete the registration details on the form below. \nRegistrations should be made with institutional/business email addresses.\n\n  \n"] 2019-04-12 01:30:00 UTC 2019-04-12 03:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Cosmic Machines

    21 August 2019

    Cosmic Machines https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/cosmic-machines Registrations have now closed for Cosmic Machines. The use of Machine Learning in Astronomy is rapidly increasing, and the opportunities its powerful techniques present are exciting. However, the scope and dynamism of Machine Learning can make the task of starting to use it seem daunting. To assist researchers the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Astronomy Data and Computing Services (ADACS) present Cosmic Machines – an online workshop where participants will be guided through a hands-on introduction to the use of Machine Learning in observational astronomy. The focus will be on gaining an appreciation for the utility of Machine Learning and how to quickly get started using it in your own research. ADACS is a collaboration between Swinburne University, Curtin University, and the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, funded by Astronomy Australia Ltd, via the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, that aims to provide focused astronomy training, support and expertise to assist astronomers to maximise the scientific return from data and computing infrastructure. During the Cosmic Machines workshop,  we will provide you with data, code and access to a GPU – everything you need to enable you to take your first steps into the realm of ML in astronomy!   Prerequisites for participants Skills: Exposure to programming, no specific language required Equipment: Laptop or PC with internet and browser Schedule Challenge: Can we write a program to classify galaxies in SDSS images to better than 90% accuracy? 11:00 am to 11:30 am Setting the scene – Introduction to Pawsey & cloud computing 11:30 am to 12:00 pm Introduction to Machine Learning – Artificial neural networks and Deep Learning 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm Object detection – Introduction to Convolutional Neural Networks 12:30 pm to 12:45 pm Break 12:45 pm to 1:00 pm A Swiss army knife for research – Introduction to jupyter notebooks 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm Finding data – Machine Learning open data sets 1:30 pm to 2:00 pm Using the sweat of someone else’s brow – Introduction to Transfer Learning 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm Other challenges? – Identifying fireballs in Desert Fireball Network images with CNNs 2:30 pm to 2:45 pm Break 2:45 pm to 3:00 pm Review and Q&A   Registration Registrations have now closed for Cosmic Machines.  For more information or any questions, email help@pawsey.org.au 2019-08-21 03:00:00 UTC 2019-08-21 07:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Data", "Training"]]
  • Lunch and Learn: Test driving Nimbus with Simon Yin

    12 May 2020

    Lunch and Learn: Test driving Nimbus with Simon Yin https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/lunch-and-learn-test-driving-nimbus-with-simon-yin ["University research groups have adopted AWS, Azure and Nectar Clouds", " in April 2020, the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre launched a refreshed Cloud platform.  \nPlease note: This event is from 12pm AEST / 10am AWST \nJoin cloud user Simon Yin, Research Software Engineer, from the Research Technology Services team at UNSW, for a lunch and learn. He will walk-through his test-drvie of Nimbus, setting up containers (Docker and Singularity) and running Shiny, a package that makes it easy to build interactive web apps straight from R.  \nYou can read Simon’s full test drive here. \nAll you have to do is register below", " when you do, meeting details will be emailed directly to you. \nPlease note: This event is from 12pm AEST / 10am AWST \n \n"] 2020-05-12 02:00:00 UTC 2020-05-12 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Training"]]
  • Quantum for industry growth

    28 August 2020

    Quantum for industry growth https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/quantum-for-industry-growth Come and join this upcoming Pawsey Friday to find out what Quantum computing has to offer to Australia’s industry from applications to the value it can deliver. Covering from Quantum’s Australia landscape to the roles and opportunities for SME’s. corporations, government, universities and investors, Quantum for Industry growth is an event not to be missed. Pawsey recently established a partnership with Quantum Brilliance – an Australian quantum computing company, using diamond to develop quantum computers that can operate at room temperature-  to advance Australian Quantum Computing. As part of that initiative, the Centre is seeking to develop quantum expertise among Pawsey staff and users, followed by access to a quantum emulator later on. If your sector can benefit from Quantum, you could be among the first few that will discover its power at Pawsey. If you missed our first Quantum event watch here. It will tell you more about Quantum computing and its possibilities. About the event The session is structured into: Three (3) presentations Dr Cathy Foley – CSIRO Chief Scientist Mr Shaun Wilson – Serial entrepreneur and co-founder of successful Quantum & AI companies QxBranch and Shoal Group Dr Andrew Horsley – Co-founder and CEO at Quantum Brilliance Panel discussion Joining the presenter will be: Mr Bill Bartee – Partner, Main Sequence Ventures Dr Maciej Cytowski – Head of Scientific Services at Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Virtual network session with each presenter What will be covered during the event The national quantum computing landscape Opportunities in quantum computing for industry The national quantum industry roadmap The pathway forward for generating a healthy quantum innovation community and industry Please register using the form below to save the date About the presenter Dr Cathy Foley- CSIRO Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Foley is Chief Scientist of CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency and innovation catalyst. CSIRO solves the greatest challenges through innovative science and technology. It is one of the world’s largest mission-driven multidisciplinary science and research organisations, collaborating with industry, government, academia and the community to unlock a better future for everyone. Dr Foley has made significant contributions to the understanding of superconducting materials and to the development of devices using superconductors to detect magnetic fields and locate valuable deposits of minerals. Dr Foley has a passion for advancing scientific research and has held various roles, including a member of the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council, President of the National Executive for Australian Institute of Physics, President of Science and Technology Australia, Editor-in-Chief of Superconductor Science and Technology journal, and Council Member for Questacon. In 2020, Cathy was recognised alongside Australia’s top scientific minds and elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. Dr Foley is a strong advocate for women in STEM and is committed to tackling gender equality. As a leader in CSIRO, she is working to enhance collaboration across the sector and turn more world-class research into benefits for the nation. Seeking to start the conversation between government, researchers and industry on the benefit of quantum technology to Australian Industry, Dr Foley, recently launched the quantum roadmap report. The report can be found here. Dr Foley LinkedIn Mr Shaun Wilson – Serial entrepreneur and co-founder of successful Quantum & AI companies QxBranch and Shoal Group Mr Shaun Wilson is an accomplished serial entrepreneur, most recently the Founder of quantum software company, QxBranch, and systems engineering company, Shoal Group. QxBranch, founded by Shaun, was recently acquired by Rigetti Computing in July-2019. QxBranch, is a spin-out directly from Shoal in 2014 (described here), QxBranch has garnered major brand-name clients world-wide across the finance, insurance, cyber-security, biotech, energy, sports and pharmaceutical. Shoal Group is one of Australia’s leading systems engineering company. Shaun also sits on a range of boards, for example, Space Industry Association of Australia. Mr Wilson LinkedIn Dr Andrew Horsley – Co-founder and CEO at Quantum Brilliance Dr Andrew Horsley is CEO and co-founder of Quantum Brilliance, a Canberra-based start-up using diamonds to build quantum computers which operate at room temperature. Dr Andrew Horsley is a leading expert in designing, building and operating quantum computers and system. Prior to founding Quantum Brilliance, Andrew has over 8 years of experience in managing quantum engineering projects in Australia, Switzerland and Germany. Dr Horsley LinkedIn   Mr Bill Bartee – Partner, Main Sequence Ventures Bill is the Managing Director of Main Sequence Ventures (CSIRO’s venture fund) and focuses on investing in quantum technologies, AI/ML, synthetic biology, and data information. Bill has been working with technology founders in Australia and the US for 20+ years and has led investments in many multi-billion dollar companies including Seek, Altium, Looksmart, onebox, and Culture Amp. Bill was also co-founder and Partner of Blackbird Ventures  (Blackbird Fund 1 and 2 and Follow-on-Fund 1) one of Australia’s leading venture funds. Blackbird’s first fund is a top decile performer globally and is composed of leading companies such as Canva, Zoox, Culture Amp, Safety Culture, Autopilot, Accelo, and others. Bill has a depth of experience as a successful builder, CEO, and investor in addition to a deep network of venture and customer contacts globally. Bill holds a Bachelor of Science, MBA, and Juris Doctorate degrees. Mr Bartee LinkedIn Dr Maciej Cytowski – Head of Scientific Services at Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Maciej joined Pawsey in 2017 as a Supercomputing Application Specialist and holds a PhD in Computational Science. He is a mathematician and computational scientist and has expertise is optimisation and development of application on massively parallel and accelerated HPC systems. Since 2004 he has been involved in many HPC projects including porting weather prediction codes to Cray X1e vector architecture, accelerating astrophysical computational kernels on IBM Cell processors, optimisation of open-source simulation codes on IBM Power7 architecture and developing scalable codes on IBM Blue Gene/Q, Cray XC40. Maciej is a highly documented author with more than 25 publications in various fields of computational science. Dr Cytowski LinkedIn 2020-08-28 06:00:00 UTC 2020-08-28 08:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Seminar"]
  • The opportunities for Extreme Scale computing

    29 October 2020

    The opportunities for Extreme Scale computing https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/the-opportunities-for-extreme-scale-computing Around the world, science is leading the response to some of humanity’s greatest challenges, from cancer research to climate change and the discovery and exploration of new galaxies. The power and possibilities of scientific discovery are enabled by world-class supercomputing infrastructure such as that provided by the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre. As Pawsey undergoes its biggest upgrade since inception, this virtual event will bring together leading researchers from different scientific domains including health, radio astronomy and engineering to discuss the new capacity for discovery and breakthroughs that modern supercomputers like Pawsey’s will enable.  The event will explore the research possibilities that we can expect to see in the future as scientists leverage significant leaps in technology and look forward to exascale computing to tackle some of Australia (and the world’s) greatest challenges. Join us to discover the potential that supercomputers can bring to diverse research fields such as health, AI, and astronomy in a panel discussion moderated by Mark Stickells, Pawsey Executive Director. Hear about the biggest scientific discoveries enabled by HPC, and the next era of science and supercomputing from Australia’s leading researchers. Pawsey is pleased to host: Melanie Johnston-Hollitt, Director, Curtin Institute for Computation & Director, Murchison Widefield Array. Astronomy Amanda Barnard, Australian National University, Senior Professor of Computational Science, ANU. Machine learning and HPC Alan Mark, Affil Professorial Research Fellow, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland. Health If you are an Australian researcher with a computational problem at scale or an HPC enthusiast, this event is for you! This free event will be held online and there will be an opportunity for questions at the end of the discussion. Register to receive a zoom link closer to the event:   The event will take place at 10:00 am AWST 12:00 pm AEST 1:00 pm AEDT 2020-10-29 02:00:00 UTC 2020-10-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • NCI TechTake

    27 April - 30 November 2021

    NCI TechTake https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nci-techtake NCI Presents: TechTake is an exciting opportunity for international computational and data science leaders to discuss and demonstrate how technology supports research. Taking place on the last Tuesday of each month, this event will run online in order to reach diverse audiences across the globe and from all fields. TechTake is designed to prompt engaging and in-depth conversations about both the current state and potential futures of technology to broaden and deepen understanding. 2021-04-27 09:00:00 UTC 2021-11-30 17:00:00 UTC National Computational Infrastructure Canberra, Australia Canberra Australia 2600 National Computational Infrastucture training.nci@anu.edu.au [] researchers 1000 webinar open_to_all HPCresearchsoftwareData
  • Astronomy and Australia’s next generation of supercomputers

    29 April 2021

    Astronomy and Australia’s next generation of supercomputers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/astronomy-and-australia-s-next-generation-of-supercomputers As part of the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre’s new bi-monthly “Supercomputing Series”, you will hear from the Astronomy community, as they discuss possibilities of the Centre’s new capabilities. One more time, we have gathered a stellar group of researchers that will be discussing their experiences as part of a panel. This event will also see the creation of a Community of Practice (CoP) where practitioners will have the opportunity to connect and discuss topics of interest, share best practices, and help answer each other’s questions on astronomy and HPC. This event has now passed, the recording is available on Pawsey’s YouTube channel – https://youtu.be/-Y0BJar6gTw. About the event 9:30 am AWST / 11:30 am AEST / 12:30 pm AEDT Panellist Dr Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin University) Dr Luigi Iapichino (Leibniz Supercomputing Center) Lead of the Quantum Computing team at LRZ Dr Elaine Sadler (CSIRO) ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) Hosted by Professor Alan Duffy, astrophysicist and Director of Space Technology and Industry Institute at Swinburne University of Technology Topics covered during this webinar: Astronomy and the researcher’s work Current limitations and the potential of supercomputers to overcome them The next generation of astronomy research Pawsey supercomputing specialist supporting the astronomy community will join the panel (see here for staff bios): Pascal Elahi Lachlan Campbell Panellist bios Dr Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin University) Natasha works at the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research. She helped to commission the low-frequency SKA precursor radio telescope, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in outback Western Australia. Natasha specialises in developing new pipelines and algorithms for radio astronomy data processing, and searching the data for new discoveries. She used the MWA to survey the entire southern sky for the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, which gave astronomers the first “radio colour” view of the low-frequency sky. In 2017 she was named the WA Tall Poppy Scientist of the Year, in 2018 one of the ABC’s Top 5 scientists, and in 2019 a Superstar of STEM. In 2020 Natasha commenced an ARC Future Fellowship to expand the low-frequency view of the universe to greater depth and resolution than ever before. Dr Luigi Iapichino (Leibniz Supercomputing Center) Lead of the Quantum Computing team at LRZ Luigi is co-founder of the Bavarian Quantum Computing eXchange (BQCX). Among his research interests are quantum computing simulations on high-end HPC systems and HPC/QC integration. He completed his PhD in physics at the Technical University of Munich in 2005, working at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. Before moving to LRZ in 2014, he worked at the Universities of Würzburg and Heidelberg, involved in research projects related to computational astrophysics. At LRZ he was team leader of the Application Lab for Astro and Plasma Physics (AstroLab) collaborating with researchers on numerical simulations, code modernisation and visualisation of massive datasets. Dr Elaine Sadler (CSIRO) ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) Elaine Sadler is the ATNF Chief Scientist at CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS) and Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sydney. She is an expert in the areas of astrophysics and galaxy evolution and has helped to lead several major astronomical surveys of the southern sky. As ATNF Chief Scientist, Elaine’s responsibilities include providing strategic advice on the science direction of the ATNF and CSIRO’s Square Kilometre Array (SKA) activities. She continues to carry out research in astronomy, and is co-leader of the ‘First Large Absorption Survey in HI’ (FLASH) project, which is using CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope in Western Australia to find out how the amount of neutral hydrogen in galaxies (the raw material from which new generations of stars can form) changes over cosmic time.   2021-04-29 01:30:00 UTC 2021-04-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Supercomputing"]]
  • Getting started with Containers

    12 May 2021

    Getting started with Containers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/getting-started-with-containers-92a11b8a-bc40-45ce-9610-e5d22d586776 What are containers? Who uses them? When, and why? You’ll hear an expert’s overview of using containers on supercomputers and the Cloud, and learn from real life examples of simple, domain-agnostic use. Absolute beginners are welcome to come along and ask the questions you’ve been too embarrassed to ask! This webinar is a collaboration between Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Australian BioCommons to celebrate Data Science Week. Presenter: Dr Sarah Beecroft, HPC Research Fellow, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Date/time: 12 May 2021 – 12:00-13:00 AEST / 11:30 – 12:30 ACST / 10:00-11:00 AWST Register here 2021-05-12 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-12 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Community of Practice", "Webinar"]]
  • Getting Started with Containers

    12 May 2021

    Getting Started with Containers https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/getting-started-with-containers What are containers? Who uses them? When, and why? You’ll hear an expert’s overview of using containers on supercomputers and the Cloud, and learn from real life examples of simple, domain-agnostic use. Absolute beginners are welcome to come along and ask the questions you’ve been too embarrassed to ask! This webinar is a collaboration between Pawsey Supercomputing Centre and Australian BioCommons to celebrate Data Science Week. Presenter: Dr Sarah Beecroft, HPC Research Fellow, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre 2021-05-12 10:00:00 UTC 2021-05-12 11:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Pawsey Supercomputing CentreAustralian BioCommons ann.backhaus@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all containers, bioinformatics, reproducible, portable, scalable
  • Ask Me Anything: SLURM

    17 May 2021

    Ask Me Anything: SLURM https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-slurm Pawsey Supercomputing Centre invites you to join us for a Pawsey Hour (Ask. Me. Anything.), our way of reaching out to the research community. Pawsey Hour AMA is an opportunity to join in a discussion with Pawsey expert staff and an online community of peers. This session will focus on SLURM, Pawsey’s job scheduler. If you have any pressing questions please join the session, especially if you are: New researchers who want to know if Pawsey services are for them Current users who have specific questions about our infrastructure and expertise, or their research challenges (within the Pawsey context) Register here, via Zoom. This Zoom session will be held on Monday 10 May from 10.00-11.00 am AWST. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting from Zoom. If you have any issues with registering or do not receive the Zoom details upon registration, please email us at help@pawsey.org.au. 2021-05-17 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-17 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["AMA"]
  • Ask Me Anything: Containers & Bioinformatics

    31 May 2021

    Ask Me Anything: Containers & Bioinformatics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-containers-bioinformatics Pawsey Supercomputing Centre invites you to join us for a Pawsey Hour (Ask. Me. Anything.), our way of reaching out to the research community. The AMA is an opportunity to join in a discussion with Pawsey expert staff and an online community of peers. This session will focus on Containers and Bioinformatics. If you have any pressing questions please join the session, especially if you are: New researchers who want to know if Pawsey services are for them Current users who have specific questions about our infrastructure and expertise, or their research challenges (within the Pawsey context) Register here, via Zoom. This Zoom session will be held on Monday 31 May from 10.00-11.00 am AWST / 12.00-1.00pm AEST. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting from Zoom and an opportunity to save this event in your calendar. If you have any issues with registering or do not receive the Zoom details upon registration, please email us at help@pawsey.org.au. The event will take place at 10:00 am AWST / 12:00 pm AEST on Monday 31 May 2021. 2021-05-31 02:00:00 UTC 2021-05-31 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["AMA"]
  • PaCER Seminar: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    15 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Computational Fluid Dynamics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-computational-fluid-dynamics Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing.   Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. The second event of the series is focusing on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and features Prof Richard Sandberg and Evatt Hawkes, from the University of Melbourne and  University of New South Wales, respectively and Dr Christopher Leonardi from the University of Queensland.  The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes.  The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix.  Join us on Tuesdays of June to find out what their projects are about and the impact that could potentially have in the different research fields in Australia and around the world.  Register to join the online seminar here. About the projects GT-to-X-Gas Turbine simulations towards Exascale (GTx)  Towards exascale simulations for efficient, low-emissions gas turbines  Richard Sandberg – University Melbourne and Evatt Hawkes – University of New South Wales Collaborators: The University of Melbourne/ University of New South Wales / General Electric (GE) ARC Future Fellows, Prof Richard Sandberg and Prof Evatt Hawkes are joining efforts to work ‘Towards exascale simulations for efficient, low-emission gas turbines’. Their project aims to develop the next generation of highly efficient gas turbines, and gas turbines capable of burning renewable hydrogen fuel, a detailed understanding of flow and combustion physics and accurate and reliable predictive tools are required.  Focusing on i) upscale our in-house codes for Pawsey’s next-generation of supercomputers and beyond and ii) demonstrate the combination of these capabilities in unprecedented high-fidelity simulations of several main components of gas turbines at engine-relevant conditions, UNSW and University of Melbourne researchers are teaming up with the major gas-turbine manufacturer GE to enable the development of systems with improved fuel economy, lower emissions, and capabilities to burn renewable hydrogen. The produced data will shed light on important phenomena and will be used to improve predictive tools used in industry.  MaPMoPS  Massively Parallel Models of Particle Suspensions  Christopher Leonardi – University of Queensland  Dr Christopher Leonardi’s PaCER project will develop computational models of complex particle suspensions at previously intractable scales for the investigation of novel reservoir stimulation techniques. This work will rearchitect the team’s open-source computational fluid dynamics code, TCLB, so that it can best leverage the next-generation supercomputer systems.  It is currently difficult or impossible to observe the impact of these approaches, positive or negative, in experimental investigations.  High-fidelity computations at physically meaningful length scales, such as those proposed in this project, represent a paradigm shift in the way that subsurface operations are designed and tested, and have the potential to significantly improve the management of subsurface resources.  The outcomes of this project align with the Australian Government’s vision for a “gas-fired recovery” from the COVID-19 recession. The development of sophisticated predictive models for technical subsurface challenges, championed by reports from the Chief Scientist and Engineer of NSW, the US Department of Energy, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, among others. About the presenters Prof Richard Sandberg is Chair of Computational Mechanics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Melbourne. His main interest is in high-fidelity simulation of turbulent flows and the associated noise generation in order to gain physical understanding of flow and noise mechanisms. He also uses the data to help assess and improve low-order models that can be employed in an industrial context, in particular by pursuing novel machine-learning approaches. He received his PhD in 2004 in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Arizona and prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he was a Professor of Fluid Dynamics and Aeroacoustics in the Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics research group at the University of Southampton and headed the UK Turbulence Consortium (www.turbulence.ac.uk), coordinating the work packages for compressible flows and flow visualisations and databases. He was awarded a veski innovation fellowship in July 2015 entitled: “Impacting Industry by enabling a step-change in simulation fidelity for flow and noise problems” and has been granted an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship for 2020-2023. Prof Evatt Hawkes is a Professor at the University of New South Wales, Sydney (UNSW). His group applies high fidelity computational fluid dynamics models to turbulent, reacting flows that underpin the performance of combustion and solar energy systems. His work at the nexus of big data and engineering applications is usually carried out with the aid of largescale supercomputing resources with a view to making fundamental and practical advances in problems of industrial relevance in transportation, power generation, and other energy systems. Prior to joining UNSW in 2007, Evatt graduated from the University of Cambridge with a PhD in 2001 and subsequently worked as a post-doc at the Combustion Research Facility of Sandia National Laboratories. He serves as Associate Editor of Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, as Advisory Editor of Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, and regularly serves as co-chair for the Turbulent Flames colloquium at the International Symposia on Combustion. Hawkes’ contributions and leadership in turbulent combustion modelling have been recognised most notably by the award of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship in 2011, and in 2018 by his election as one of the inaugural class of Fellows of the Combustion Institute.   Dr Christopher Leonardi is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at the University of Queensland and an Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellow (Mid-Career). Christopher holds a B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering with Class Honours from James Cook University, a PhD in Civil and Computational Engineering from Swansea University, UK, and a Research Affiliate appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. Leonardi’s research is currently targeted at the development of large-scale numerical models which can be used to provide insight into the complex characteristics of fluid-solid interaction in oil and gas reservoirs. Much of this work is undertaken in close collaboration with industry via the UQ Centre for Natural Gas. Particular fields of expertise include the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flows, the discrete element method (DEM) for discontinuous systems, and the finite element method (FEM) for solid mechanics problems. In addition to his academic pursuits, Christopher has over five years of consulting experience, applying both computational and analytical techniques to solve problems in the mining and mechanical engineering disciplines. In that time he applied innovative FEM-DEM technology to industry problems in the areas of bulk materials handling, geomechanics, and structural mechanics. Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-15 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-15 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • PaCER Seminar: Particle and molecular physics

    22 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Particle and molecular physics https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-particle-and-molecular-physics Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing. Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. During its third week, the series is focusing on particle and molecular physics and is featuring Prof Pat Scott from the University of Queensland, Dr Waseem Kamleh from the University of Adelaide, and Curtin University, Professor Igor Bray. The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes. The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix. Join us each Tuesday in June to find out about their projects and their research impacts across Australia and the world. Register to join the online seminar here. About the projects EXA-GAMBIT   Searching for New Particles from the Attoscale to the Exascale with GAMBIT Pat Scott Collaborators from the University of Queensland/ Monash University and The University of Adelaide  The broad objective of this project is to perform the world’s largest and most complete tests of theories for new particles and fundamental symmetries, by using astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics to attempt to detect new particles associated with physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics.  The Standard Model of particle physics is both the most fundamental and the most precisely validated theory in all of science– yet it is still incomplete. New particles are needed to explain the identity of dark matter and dark energy, why neutrinos have mass, why the Higgs boson is as light as it is, and why we are surrounded by so much more matter than antimatter.  This project will make it possible to combine the results of all relevant experiments and bring them to bear on all the leading theories for new particles, by using exascale computing hardware to simulate billions of possible experimental signatures simultaneously.  MCCC   Calculation of collisions with molecular targets using the convergent close-coupling method  Igor Bray Curtin University Bray’s project, Calculation of collisions with molecular targets using the convergent close-coupling method, will produce high-quality and comprehensive data describing the collisions of electrons and positrons with molecules, which are much needed in a range of applications. The next big step forward in the field of molecular collisions is the adaptation and optimisation of the MCCC codes to exploit the capabilities of the next-generation supercomputers, with a particular emphasis on accelerating the calculations using GPUs. These developments will allow the first-ever large-scale collision calculations to be performed for molecules more complex than H2, and the resulting data sets will drastically improve plasma models in a wide range of scientific and industrial applications. The GPU (Graphics Processing Units) implementation of the MCCC codes and optimisation for the next-generation supercomputer at Pawsey will allow, for the first time, for computationally-intensive calculations to be performed for the heavier hydride molecules. The comprehensive sets of collision data this will produce will represent another major step forward in the field of plasma science and the development of ITER, on par with the original development of the MCCC codes for H2. EmPRiSM  Emergent Phenomena Revealed in Subatomic Matter  Waseem Kamleh  University of Adelaide  The central goal of this proposal is to reveal emergent phenomena in subatomic matter through the development of novel algorithms that harness extreme-scale computing. Lattice quantum chromodynamics (Lattice QCD) is the fundamental theory that enables us to compute the properties of interacting matter. Advances in computing created by this project will unlock unachievable calculations of quantum fluctuations in the space-time vacuum. This research will develop computational techniques that transform our understanding of the nuclear matter that constitutes the observable world, from the atomic scale of elemental hydrogen to the cosmic scale of neutron stars. Exploring vacuum contributions to the structure of the proton and other strongly interacting particles, the research will advance theoretical understanding and challenge experimental programs. About the presenters Pat Scott is a particle and astroparticle phenomenologist. Pat works with particle theory and experiment, cosmology, solar and stellar physics, high energy astrophysics, statistics, computational physics, supercomputing and other things – usually two or three at a time. Pat is part of the GAMBIT Community, a group of other like-minded researchers from all over the HEP-astro diaspora, trying to put together all the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle that is the search for physics Beyond the Standard Model (of particle physics). A big part of that is dark matter, but really, they’ll take any new particles they can get. Pat was the Head of GAMBIT from its founding in 2012 to the end of 2020. Before joining UQ in 2019, Pat was an STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the Fundamental Physics Section at Imperial College, a Banting Fellow in the HEP Theory group at McGill University, a PhD student in the Cosmology, Astroparticle Physics and String Theory Group at the Oskar Klein Centre in Stockholm, and an Honours student at the Mt Stromlo Observatory at ANU in Canberra. Igor Bray is a John Curtin Distinguished Professor, and Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Curtin University. His research interests are in the field of Quantum Collision Theory, where he has over 500 publications with around 13,500 citations. He has received several national awards for his research and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, American Physical Society, and Institutes of Physics in the UK and Australia. In addition to his research, he is interested in education issues broadly, and in particular High-Performance Computing. Waseem Kamleh is a world-leading expert in computational physics, with a focus on the application of advanced algorithms and technologies to non-perturbative simulations. His PhD was awarded in 2004 from the University of Adelaide. He moved to Ireland to take up a prestigious post-doctoral position at Trinity College Dublin, returning to the University of Adelaide in 2007 where he is currently a research fellow within the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter. Waseem has conducted extensive work in the field of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD), examining the origin of mass, electromagnetic interactions, resonance physics, and dynamical fermion algorithms. His expertise in high-performance computing and theoretical physics has been recognised with large awards of supercomputing resources, including Pawsey facilities such as Magnus and Athena. An early adopter of GPU programming, he also leads the transformation of the lattice QCD research programme at the University of Adelaide onto advanced technology platforms. Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-22 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-22 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • Machine Learning Regression Model for Predicting Honey Harvests

    24 June 2021

    Bentley, Australia

    Machine Learning Regression Model for Predicting Honey Harvests https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/machine-learning-regression-model-for-predicting-honey-harvests The Australian Space Data Analysis Facility (ASDAF) is hosting a FREE event, investigating whether machine learning methods can develop predictive harvest models of a key nectar source for honeybees using data from weather stations and remotely sensed datasets. The seminar will be presented by Dr Tristan Campbell. Tristan is an experienced geoscientist, with over 20 years of experience in the application of remote sensing and geophysical methods to engineering, environmental and agricultural sectors. His doctoral research resulted in a method for quantitative prediction of honey harvests in Western Australia, which is available to the bee industry through a geospatial portal for beekeepers to assess site weather conditions and expected harvests. Tristan is currently researching methods for improving weather data accuracy as model inputs and the effects of fire regimes on honey production and biodiversity. Places are limited so registration is required. Don’t miss out! Register to attend event in-person: https://bit.ly/3gD0URq (Light refreshments will be provided) Register to attend event online: https://bit.ly/3vw6GJ7 Light refreshments will be provided. 2021-06-24 16:00:00 UTC 2021-06-24 17:00:00 UTC Australian Space Data Analysis Facility Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Australia Curtin University, Kent Street Bentley Australia Australian Space Data Analysis Facility info@asdaf.space [] [] [] open_to_all []
  • PaCER Seminar: Radio astronomy

    29 June 2021

    PaCER Seminar: Radio astronomy https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/pacer-seminar-radio-astronomy Ten research projects were successfully granted access to the first Pawsey Centre for Extreme-scale Readiness (PaCER) program, establishing Australia’s research platform for extreme-scale computing.   Pawsey is hosting a series of seminars throughout June showcasing the first cohort of PaCER researchers’ projects. The last event in the series focuses on Radio Astronomy and showcases Melanie Johnston-Hollitt from Curtin University and Martin Meyer and Marcin Sokolowski from the ICRAR UWA and Curtin node respectively. The focus of the PaCER program is on both extreme scale research (algorithms design, code optimisation, application and workflow readiness) and using the computational infrastructure to facilitate research for producing world-class scientific outcomes.  The program is a partnership for collaboration between researchers and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre supercomputing specialists using the latest infrastructure provided by Setonix.  Join us each Tuesday in June to find out about their projects and their research impacts across Australia and the world.  Register to join the online seminar here.     About the projects PIGI Parallel Interferometric GPU Imaging Melanie Johnston-Hollitt – Curtin University Collaborators: Curtin University/ University of Toronto/ Pawsey Supercomputing Centre Johnston-Hollitt’s project, Parallel interferometric GPU imaging, aims to combine the distributed nature of recent interferometric reconstruction algorithms with fast instrumental modelling using GPUs to accurately reconstruct images from extremely large data sets for future instruments such as SKA_Low To provide the first end-to-end exascale astronomy calibration and imaging pipeline which has been optimized for HPC, the team will scale up calibration pipelines and deploy them in a multi-node GPU scenario combined with modern imaging algorithms scaled and deployed on HPC. HiVIS – HI Visibility Imaging for the SKA   Delivery of a next-generation data storage approach to unlock deep SKA and pathfinder observations  Martin Meyer – ICRAR UWA  Collaborators: ICRAR / CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science / SKA Organisation Headquarters (SKAO)/ Oak Ridge National Laboratory  Meyer’s project addresses one of the most significant outstanding Grand Challenge Problems for the SKA Observatory – how to optimally image multi-day deep datasets.  By developing a sparse data storage and processing pipeline based on UV-grids, this project aims to reduce the visibility storage requirements for these projects by an order of magnitude. The developed methods will simultaneously enable critically needed reprocessing to optimise the scientific outcomes from these datasets and opens up the possibility for higher resolution spatial and spectral imaging than would otherwise be possible As a testbed, Pawsey will be used to image 250h of ASKAP (Australia Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder) data from the DINGO pilot surveys, along with 500h of its first ultradeep field. These will yield some of the deepest images ever taken of atomic hydrogen content in the Universe, enabling ground-breaking novel studies of the role this fundamental fuel has played in the ongoing evolution of galaxies and its connection to their dark matter halos. In addition, the results will demonstrate a solution for the SKA data challenges in deep imaging. BLINK (Breakthrough Low-latency Imaging with Next-generation Kernels)  BLINK and you’ll miss it: blazingly-fast all-sky radio astronomy pipelines   Marcin Sokolowski – ICRAR Curtin University  This project aims to bring Pawsey’s latest-generation hardware to make real-time, image-based transient searches feasible, applied to the Murchison Widefield Array, the foremost precursor telescope for the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array.  Making real-time, image-based transient searches feasible will require a combination of the latest data processing technology offered by modern supercomputers, and novel data processing algorithms that have been optimised for both speed and sensitivity to transient signals.   If the computational challenges in this area are overcome, the untapped potential to form widefield images with millisecond time and kilohertz frequency resolutions coming from instruments such as the recently-upgraded Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the upcoming low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-Low) will transform these telescopes into extremely powerful instruments capable of detecting Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), other fast transients like “rotating radio transients” (RRATs),  i.e. sporadically emitting neutron stars and possibly other phenomena in real-time.   About the researchers Melanie Johnston-Hollitt is an internationally prominent radio astronomer working in the space between astrophysics, computer science, and big data. She is Director of the Curtin Institute for Computation (CIC), a knowledge accelerator based on the use of data science and high-performance computing aimed at producing better outcomes for research, government, and industry. In her 20-year career, Melanie has been involved in the design, construction, operation, and governance of several major international radio telescopes including the Low Frequency Array in the Netherlands, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) in Western Australia, and the billion-dollar Square Kilometre Array (SKA) which will be hosted in both Australia and South Africa. She was a founding member of the Board of Directors for the SKA Organisation where she worked on the international governance, scientific, and technical aspects of the telescope. In particular, she led the Science Analysis Pipeline design and contributed to the Science Data Processor pipeline which will be needed to extract knowledge from the vast amounts of data the SKA telescope will generate. She is the immediate past director of the 65 million-dollar MWA radio telescope and spent 9 years involved in the project, including 6 years on the international executive board (4 years as board chair) and 3 as director. As MWA Director she oversaw the third phase of the MWA project realised via the design and funding for the new ‘MWAX correlator’ – a GPU-based bespoke compute system. Her research interests span the intersection between radio astronomy, signal and image processing, and big data analytics and she leads both the multi-disciplinary team of data scientists in the CIC and the galactic and extragalactic science team in the Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy who are exploiting the MWA and other telescopes to uncover the mysteries of the Universe. Martin Meyer’s research focuses on surveys for neutral atomic hydrogen (HI)  and the role played by hydrogen gas in the formation and evolution of galaxies.  Matin leads the DINGO survey, a project that will take deep HI observations with the Australian SKA Pathfinder to understand how the HI content of the Universe has evolved over the past 4 billion years.  In the lead-up to this project, He is working on CHILES, a  deep HI survey being carried out with the VLA, as well as wide-field HI stacking experiments in the GAMA G09 field also being observed with this facility.  Martin is a member of the SKA HI galaxy science working group.   Marcin Sokolowski is a Research Fellow at Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy (CIRA), Australia. Marcin received Master Degree in Physics from the University of Warsaw, Poland in 1998and a Ph.D. degree in Physics from the National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ) in Warsaw, Poland in 2008. Between 1998 and 2003 he worked as a software programmer in a software company. From 2008 until 2012 he was an Assistant Professor in NCBJ where we worked on software for the automation of wide-field robotic telescopes and algorithms for the identification of optical transients of astrophysical origin. In the last few years, he has been looking for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) and other transients at low radio-frequencies using the wide-field images from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and all-sky images from prototype stations of the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-Low). He works in a large international team of engineers and scientists on verification, commissioning and developing novel calibration methods for prototype stations of the SKA-Low to be built in Western Australia in the coming years.   Register to join the online seminar here. 2021-06-29 02:00:00 UTC 2021-06-29 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Seminar", "Supercomputing"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Getting Started with Using the (Nimbus Research) Cloud

    29 June 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Getting Started with Using the (Nimbus Research) Cloud https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-getting-started-with-using-the-nimbus-research-cloud In this 90-minute webinar we introduce cloud computing and detail the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre’s cloud computing resource called the “Nimbus Research Cloud”. You will have ample time for questions and if you’re interested, you can also access a test environment to experiment with what you can do with cloud computing. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-06-29 06:00:00 UTC 2021-06-29 07:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Cloud", "Community of Practice", "Training"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Lunch n Learn: Teaching Online

    1 July 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Lunch n Learn: Teaching Online https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-lunch-n-learn-teaching-online In this 60-minute interactive session, we’ll share tips, tricks and gotcha’s. Whether you’re new at teaching online or have a seasoned online ‘presence’, join us. Together we’ll create a list of good practices that you can refer to over and over again, and that you can continue to build upon. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-07-01 04:30:00 UTC 2021-07-01 05:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Training", "Webinar"]]
  • ResBaz 2021: Is your science causing your laptop to burn? Identifying when to scale your research

    1 July 2021

    ResBaz 2021: Is your science causing your laptop to burn? Identifying when to scale your research https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/resbaz-2021-is-your-science-causing-your-laptop-to-burn-identifying-when-to-scale-your-research How do you know when your dataset becomes “too big”? How do you know when your laptop can no longer do what you need it to do for your research? When is it best to use cloud resources? When is it best to use supercomputing resources? When do I need both (or neither)? The answers to these questions are project-dependent, and each project is different… but there are guidelines and best practices to help you decide. During this interactive session, we will seek to answer these and associated questions. We’ll hear real stories from individuals who have had to navigate these same questions and who will be on hand to facilitate discussion, based on years of experience working with early, mid and late career researchers. This session is for attendees of the Perth ResBaz, a week long activity of learning and networking for students and staff. To register for this event, complete the following form: 2021-07-01 05:30:00 UTC 2021-07-01 06:30:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Community of Practice", "Workshop"]]
  • NVIDIA cuQuantum Session

    2 July 2021

    NVIDIA cuQuantum Session https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-cuquantum-session ["Speakers: Tom Gibbs, Manager, Developer Relations, NVIDIA", " and Shinya Morino, Senior Solutions Architect, NVIDIA \nNVIDIA cuQuantum is an SDK of optimized libraries and tools for accelerating quantum computing workflows. Developers can use cuQuantum to speed up quantum circuit simulations based on state vector, density matrix, and tensor network methods by orders of magnitude. The cuQuantum SDK will become the foundational element across quantum circuit simulations. Early work suggests cuQuantum will be able to deliver orders of magnitude speedups for all the major gate-based simulation methods researchers use today. \nThe research community – including academia, laboratories, and private industry – are all using simulators to help design and verify algorithms to run on quantum computers.  \nThis session will introduce NVIDIA cuQuantum and showcase accelerated quantum circuit simulation results based on industry estimations, extrapolations, and benchmarks on real-world computers like ORNL’s Summit, and NVIDIA’s Selene, and reference collaborations with numerous industry partners.  \nThis technical session is targeted to both academia researchers interested in the field of quantum computing, but also private industry working on developing tools for quantum circuit simulations. \nPlease complete the form below to register:\n\n"] 2021-07-02 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-02 02:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Training", "Workshop"]]
  • Ask Me Anything: Porous media visualisation and LBPM

    5 July 2021

    Ask Me Anything: Porous media visualisation and LBPM https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ask-me-anything-porous-media-visualisation-and-lbpm If you are working on Digital Rock Physics and interested in fluid flow behaviour in Porous Media, this AMA is for you.  Please join us to discuss Lattice Boltzmann Method for Porous Media (LBPM) and the opportunities for Pawsey researchers.  LBPM is one of the most complete derivatives of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) focusing on porous media providing computational as well as visualisation modules at a micro-scale. LBM is a well-known simulation tool in CFD, producing highly reliable results.   LBPM:  focuses on porous media at micro–scale  is accurate   is scalable  has features integrated with upscaling tools/techniques in high demand in the oil and gas industry  is capable of running simulation in CSG/CBM as extremely heterogeneous unconventional reservoirs rocks is free and open-source   Is LBPM of interest to the research community working at scale? Join the discussion at this AMA, and send your questions in advance via the registration form.    More information about LBPM: https://github.com/OPM/LBPM  Register here to join this AMA. Below is a sample visualisation derived from open-source data https://pawsey.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/movie.mp4 2021-07-05 02:00:00 UTC 2021-07-05 03:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["AMA", "Visualisation"]]
  • NVIDIA High Performance Visualisation

    9 July 2021

    NVIDIA High Performance Visualisation https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-high-performance-visualisation NVIDIA Omniverse is an open platform built for virtual collaboration and real-time physically accurate simulation. Complex creator, designer, and engineering visual workflows are transformed as users and teams connect major design tools, assets, and projects for collaborative iteration in a shared virtual space. The recently released Omniverse ParaView Connector gives scientists a familiar path for getting their data into Omniverse. Via the connector, scientists can continue to use ParaView’s powerful infrastructure for data ingestion and filtering before ultimately importing it to Omniverse to create rich, impactful visualizations. But, importing scientific data to Omniverse does not just enable cinematic visualization using the latest rendering technologies. It also connects that data to the broader ecosystem of content creation and rendering tools already connected to Omniverse. This session will demonstrate the basic workflow of the Omniverse ParaView Connector and how scientists can start using it for their own visualization projects. 2021-07-09 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-09 10:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Kensington, Australia Kensington Australia Pawsey Supercomputing CentreNVIDIA training@pawsey.org.au [] [] webinar open_to_all data visualisation
  • AiLab Workshop: Introduction to Chatbots

    9 July 2021

    AiLab Workshop: Introduction to Chatbots https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/ailab-workshop-introduction-to-chatbots NOTE: We provide all AiLab workshops virtually/online, as well as in-person. Introduction to Chatbots workshop explores how chatbots can be applied within organisations. This workshop compliments our other professional AI education workshops. Chatbots and conversational interfaces offer businesses the opportunity to streamline processes and provide end-users with the promise of improved customer support. Lead by an industry expert, this fun and interactive exploratory workshop introduces the concept of Chatbots (and some of the underlying AI that can be used with them), before discussing real-world examples and other possible uses. Some well-known implementation strategies/frameworks are also presented, as well as lesser known key considerations required for successful implementation. Introduction to Chatbots: Workshop Structure - Introducing AiLab - AI and Chatbots - Business Use Cases and ideas - Scope, risks and pilot solution - Summary and next steps - Learn more with AiLab! 2021-07-09 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-09 17:00:00 UTC Auckland University of Technology - AiLab Auckland University of Technology +61 (0) 8 8464 0787 [] HDR candidates, researcherstrainers 5 workshop expression_of_interest chatbotsAIconversational interfaces
  • Advanced Slurm Training

    13 - 16 July 2021

    Advanced Slurm Training https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/advanced-slurm-training-c9c8f1b1-93b6-4c1d-bc20-498e03b82453 ["This training is targeted at users who have already used SLURM but whose needs go beyond simple batch files or small interactive jobs. \nThe training outline follows: \n\nSlurm Refresher\n\nHow Slurm actually works.\nHow Slurm schedules jobs.\nHow long to wait", " how to better schedule jobs.\nSlurm and priorities", " how is it done?\n\n\nKey features\nResource Management\nRunning a job", " job/step allocation\n\nExamples – GPUs\nExamples – Job Arrays\n\n\nAdvanced Features\n\nTopology Aware Scheduling\nJob Sanity Check\nJob profiling\nMultithreading (SMT)\nHeterogeneous j obs\n\n\nJob Dependencies\n\nChain Jobs\nStaging input before running, and storing outputs\nMaster/Slave programs\nSubmitting collections of programs (multi-prog)\n\n\nSystem Information Job monitoring\nCheckpointing & Restart\nUse of SLURM API (plans to support this in the future on Pawsey systems)\n\nThis is now a waiting list, please complete the following form to be added:\nNOTE: This course is capped at 16 attendees. If you cannot attend all 4 sessions, please do not register. \n\n"] 2021-07-13 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 04:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all [["Supercomputing", "Training"]]
  • Advanced Slurm Training

    13 - 16 July 2021

    Advanced Slurm Training https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/advanced-slurm-training The training outline follows: 1. Slurm Refresher - How Slurm actually works. - How Slurm schedules jobs. - How long to wait; how to better schedule jobs. - Slurm and priorities; how is it done? 2. Key features 3. Resource Management 4. Running a job; job/step allocation - Examples – GPUs - Examples – Job Arrays 5. Advanced Features - Topology Aware Scheduling - Job Sanity Check - Job profiling - Multithreading (SMT) - Heterogeneous j obs 6. Job Dependencies - Chain Jobs - Staging input before running, and storing outputs - Master/Slave programs - Submitting collections of programs (multi-prog) 7. System Information Job monitoring 8. Checkpointing & Restart 9. Use of SLURM API (plans to support this in the future on Pawsey systems) 2021-07-13 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 12:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Pawsey Supercomputing Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] 16 workshop host_institution slurmschedulersupercomputer
  • Excel for Researchers at USYD Online

    15 - 16 July 2021

    Excel for Researchers at USYD Online https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/excel-for-researchers-at-usyd-online ## About this course Data rarely comes in the form you require. Often it is messy. Sometimes it is incomplete. And sometimes there’s too much of it. Frequently, it has errors. We’ll use one of the most widespread data wrangling tools, Microsoft Excel, to import, sort, filter, copy, protect, transform, summarise, merge, and visualise research data. While aimed at novice Excel users, most attendees will walk away with new tricks to work more efficiently with their research data. 2021-07-15 09:30:00 UTC 2021-07-16 12:30:00 UTC Intersect Australia University of Sydney Intersect Training: training@intersect.org.au [] [] 30 workshop host_institution Exceldata wranglingPivot tablesdata visualisation
  • NVIDIA OpenFoam Session - rescheduled

    16 July 2021

    NVIDIA OpenFoam Session - rescheduled https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/nvidia-openfoam-session-rescheduled Speaker: Stan Posey, Developer Relations , CFD and ESS, NVIDIA HQ, USA OpenFOAM is the most widely used non-commercial CFD software with an end user base of 10,000 organizations and 125,000 practitioners. Its high-quality development at similar level as commercial ISV software drawn the attention of the community and ESI OpenCFD declared “GPU enabling” among top 3 HPC priorities. This session will provide an overview of a new development aiming to accelerate OpenFOAM using the NVIDIA AmgX linear solver library that provides GPU support to the PETSc4FOAM library introduced during 2020 by members of the OpenFOAM HPC Technical Committee. This technical session is targeted at OpenFOAM users interested in using GPU acceleration for their CFD simulations. After you register, you will receive a registration confirmation. The Link to participate will be sent to you closer to the day of the event. Please complete the form below to register: 2021-07-16 01:00:00 UTC 2021-07-16 02:00:00 UTC Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre Online, Virtual, Australia Online, Virtual, Australia Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre training@pawsey.org.au [] [] [] open_to_all ["Training"]
  • Slurm for beginners

    21 July 2021

    Clayton, Australia

    Slurm for beginners https://staging.dresa.org.au/events/slurm-for-beginners A test event for searching 2021-07-21 09:00:00 UTC 2021-07-21 17:00:00 UTC None Monash College, 49 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, Australia Monash College, 49 Rainforest Walk Clayton Australia 3800 Monash University None [] [] dropin open_to_all []

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